AskDefine | Define occult

Dictionary Definition

occult adj
1 hidden and difficult to see; "an occult fracture"; "occult blood in the stool"
2 having an import not apparent to the senses nor obvious to the intelligence; beyond ordinary understanding; "mysterious symbols"; "the mystical style of Blake"; "occult lore"; "the secret learning of the ancients" [syn: mysterious, mystic, mystical, secret, orphic]

Noun

1 supernatural forces and events and beings collectively; "She doesn't believe in the supernatural" [syn: supernatural]
2 occult practices and techniques; "he is a student of the occult" [syn: occult arts]

Verb

1 cause an eclipse of (a celestial body) by intervention; "The Sun eclipses the moon today"; "Planets and stars often are occulted by other celestial bodies" [syn: eclipse]
2 become concealed or hidden from view or have its light extinguished; "The beam of light occults every so often"
3 hide from view; "The lids were occulting her eyes"

User Contributed Dictionary

English

Etymology

From occulto.

Noun

  1. Supernatural affairs.

Translations

supernatural affairs
  • Finnish: okkultismi, rajatieto
  • French: occulte
  • German: Okkult
  • Italian: occulto
  • Japanese: オカルト, 超自然現象
  • Spanish: oculto
  • Swedish: ockult

Verb

  1. : To cover.
    The earth occults the moon during a lunar eclipse.

Translations

to cover
  • Finnish: peittää

Adjective

en-adj more
  1. Secret; hidden from general knowledge; undetected
    occult blood loss; occult cancer
  2. Related to the occult.

Translations

secret; hidden from general knowledge; undetected
  • Finnish: huomaamaton
related to the occult
  • Finnish: okkulttinen, yliluonnollinen

Extensive Definition

The word occult comes from the Latin word occultus (clandestine, hidden, secret), referring to "knowledge of the hidden". In the medical sense it is used to refer to a structure or process that is hidden, e.g. an "occult bleed" may be one detected indirectly by the presence of otherwise unexplained anaemia.
The word has many uses in the English language, popularly meaning "knowledge of the paranormal", as opposed to "knowledge of the measurable", usually referred to as science. The term is sometimes popularly taken to mean "knowledge meant only for certain people" or "knowledge that must be kept hidden", but for most practicing occultists it is simply the study of a deeper spiritual reality that extends beyond pure reason and the physical sciences. The terms esoteric and arcane can have a very similar meaning, and the three terms are often interchangeable.
The term occult is also used as a label given to a number of magical organizations or orders, and the teachings and practices as taught by them. The name also extends to a large body of literature and spiritual philosophy.

Occultism

Occultism is the study of occult or hidden wisdom. To the occultist it is the study of "Truth", a deeper truth that exists beneath the surface: 'The truth is always hidden in plain sight'. It can involve such subjects as magic (alternatively spelled and defined as magick or Magyk), extra-sensory perception, astrology, spiritualism, numerology and lucid dreaming. There is often a strong religious element to these studies and beliefs, and many occultists profess adherence to religions such as Gnosticism, Hermeticism, Luciferianism, Thelema, and Neopaganism. While Christianity, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam are generally not considered as occult, some of their modern interpretations can be, as the interpretation of Hinduism within Theosophy or the various occult interpretations of the Jewish Kabbalah. Orthodox members of such religions are likely to consider such interpretations as false; For example, the Kabbalah Centre has been criticised by Jewish scholars.
The word "occult" is somewhat generic, in that almost everything that isn't claimed by any of the major religions can be considered the occult. Even religious scientists have difficulties in defining occultism. A broad definition is offered by Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke:
"OCCULTISM has its basis in a religious way of thinking, the roots of which stretch back into antiquity and which may be described as the Western esoteric tradition. Its principal ingredients have been identified as Gnosticism, the Hermetic treatises on alchemy and magic, Neo-Platonism, and the Kabbalah, all originating in the eastern Mediterranean area during the first few centuries AD."
From the 15th to 17th century, these Free Masons kinds of ideas had a brief revival, that was halted by the triumph of empirical sciences in the seventeenth-century. "By the eighteenth century these unorthodox religious and philosophical concerns were well defined as 'occult', inasmuch as they lay on the outermost fringe of accepted forms of knowledge and discurse," and were only preserved by a few antiquarians and mystics. However, from about 1770 onwards, a renewed desire for mystery, an interest in the Middle Ages and a romantic temper encouraged a revival of occultism in Europe, "a reaction to the rationalist Enlightenment."
That the Kabbalah has been considered an occult study is also perhaps because of its popularity among magi (the biblical wise men who visited the Infant Jesus are said to have been magi of Zoroastrianism) and Thelemites. Kabbalah was later adopted by the Golden Dawn and brought out into the open by Aleister Crowley and his protégé Israel Regardie. Since that time many authors have emphasized a syncretic approach by drawing parallels between different disciplines.
Direct insight into or perception of the occult does not consist of access to physically measurable facts, but is arrived at through the mind or the spirit. The term can refer to mental, psychological or spiritual training. It is important to note, however, that many occultists will also study science (perceiving science as a branch of Alchemy) to add validity to occult knowledge in a day and age where the mystical can easily be undermined as flights-of-fancy. An oft-cited means of gaining insight into the occult is the use of a focus. A focus may be a physical object, a ritualistic action (for example, meditation or chanting), or a medium in which one becomes wholly immersed; these are just a few examples of the vast and numerous avenues that can be explored.

Science and the occult

Occultism is conceived of as the study of the inner nature of things, as opposed to the outer characteristics that are studied by science. The German Kantian philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer designates this 'inner nature' with the term 'Will', and suggests that science and mathematics are unable to penetrate beyond the relationship between one thing and another in order to explain the 'inner nature' of the thing itself, independent of any external causal relationships with other 'things'. Schopenhauer also points towards this inherently relativistic nature of mathematics and conventional science in his formulation of the 'World as Will'. By defining a thing solely in terms of its external relationships or effects we only find its external, or explicit nature. Occultism, on the other hand, is concerned with the nature of the 'thing-in-itself'. This is often accomplished through direct perceptual awareness, known as mysticism.
Alchemy, is considered an occult practice. Alchemy used to be common among scientists, such as Isaac Newton. During the Age of Enlightenment alchemy and science went their separate ways.

Religion and the occult

Some religious denominations view the occult as being anything supernatural or paranormal which is not achieved by or through God, and is therefore the work of an opposing and malevolent entity. The word has negative connotations for many people, and while certain practices considered by some to be "occult" are also found within mainstream religions, in this context the term "occult" is rarely used and is sometimes substituted with "esoteric".
In Judaism, special spiritual studies such as Kabbalah have been allowed for certain individuals (such as rabbis and their chosen students). These studies do not conform to mainstream Jewish ritual. Also, some forms of Islam allow spirits to be commanded in the name of Allah to do righteous works and assist steadfast Muslims. Furthermore, there are branches of Esoteric Christianity that practice divination, blessings, or appealing to angels for certain intervention, which they view as perfectly righteous, often supportable by gospel (for instance, claiming that the old commandment against divination was superseded by Christ's birth, and noting that the Magi used astrology to locate Bethlehem). Rosicrucianism, one of the most celebrated of Christianity's mystical offshoots, has lent aspects of its philosophy to most Christian-based occultism since the 17th century.
Tantra, originating in India, includes amongst its various branches a variety of ritualistic practices ranging from visualisation exercises and the chanting of mantras to elaborate rituals involving sex or animal sacrifice, sometimes performed in forbidden places such as cremation grounds. Tantric texts were at one stage unavailable for mass public consumption due to the social stigma attached to the practices. In general, tantra was predominantly associated with black magic and the tantriks were held in great dishonor.

Notes

References

  • Encyclopedia of the Occult, the Esoteric and the Supernatural

Further reading

  • Bardon, Franz (1971). Initiation into Hermetics. Wuppertal: Ruggeberg.
  • Fortune, Dion (2000). The Mystical Qabala. Weiser Books. ISBN 1578631505
  • Regardie, I., Cicero, C., & Cicero, S. T. (2001). The Tree of Life: An Illustrated Study in Magic. St. Paul, Minn: Llewellyn Publications.
  • Rogers, L. W. (1909). 'Hints to Young Students of Occultism''. Albany, N.Y.: The Theosophical Book Company.

External links

occult in Afrikaans: Okkultisme
occult in Arabic: تنجيم
occult in Bulgarian: Окултизъм
occult in Catalan: Ocultisme
occult in Welsh: Yr Ocwlt
occult in Danish: Okkultisme
occult in German: Okkultismus
occult in Estonian: Okultism
occult in Spanish: Ocultismo
occult in Persian: نهان‌شناسی
occult in French: Occultisme
occult in Croatian: Okultizam
occult in Indonesian: Okultisme
occult in Italian: Occulto
occult in Hebrew: אוקולטיזם
occult in Macedonian: окултизам
occult in Dutch: Occultisme
occult in Japanese: オカルト
occult in Polish: Okultyzm
occult in Portuguese: Ocultismo
occult in Russian: Оккультизм
occult in Albanian: Okultizmi
occult in Finnish: okkultismi
occult in Swedish: Ockultism
occult in Thai: สิ่งลึกลับ
occult in Chinese: 神秘学

Synonyms, Antonyms and Related Words

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